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Native Plants Return to South Williamsburg

July 18, 2012

As a proud member of the Southside Coalition for Green and Open Spaces (SCGOS), theHuman Impacts Institute  (HII) is excited to move forward  with plans to revitalize green spaces in South Williamsburg.  The SCGOS was formed in November, 2011, by concerned community members and organizations, to serve the community by supporting more green spaces in our community of Southside Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and increasing the care of existing green and open spaces.  As part of our Growing Our Roots programs, which train community members and youth in urban tree care and community healthy, HII has been working this hot summer of 2012 to engage even more community members in local environmental stewardship.With support from the Citizens Committee for New York City, HII will be working with coalition partners the Fall of 2012 to  restore untended tree beds, planting species native to Brooklyn’s natural environment, and encouraging long-term tree stewardship through tree adoption. In order to jump start this program, this summer,  the Human Impacts Institute sat down with two other local Citizens Committee grant recipients–the Havemayer Street Group and El Puente. These three groups, together, will coordinate community planting days and share resources in order to optimally use the funds.

 

 

The reintroduction of native species plants in the Southside community will help mitigate pollution and storm-water runoff, beautify the neighborhood, and bring the community together.  There will be several days devoted to planting, where community members can become acquainted with native plants, enjoy some quality time with friends and neighbors, and get their hands dirty! HII will launch the project with coalition partners this Fall of 2012.

 

Interested in participating? Email us at Programs@HumanImpactsInstitute.org and stay tuned for details about where and when planting days will be held, as well as for progress reports, pictures, and other updates.

 

By Tess Clark, Human Impacts Institute 2012 Environmental Education Intern

 

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